Extended Lactation, Proven Dairy Herd, Great conformation, Easy to milk

Recipies and Yield

Milk Used

  • Milk used for these recipes is a mixture of Mini Nubian and Nigerian Dwarf, from the Northern Dawn herd.
  • The yields are from myself and a few friends who love to play with the recipes.

Yogurt

Yogurt Recipe from a Friend:

(Thanks to Naomi for this recipe)

  • preheated my oven to 120 degrees
  • turn oven off
  • heat milk to 180 degrees
  • cool to 110 degrees
  • put the yogurt in the cooled milk
  • let it sit overnight (8-12 hours) with the oven light left on to maintain heat

Milk Used

Yogurt Used

Yield

almost 2 quarts 4 oz 1 1/2 quarts

Place holder

Quark Cheese

(soft white unpasteurized cheese, although in the United States it is pasteurized. I don’t pasteurize mine.)

About Quark Cheese

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/raw_goatmilk/message/1484
http://budwig-diet.co.uk/quark-cottage-cheese/
http://www.budwigcenter.com/anti-cancer-diet.php
Rich in Protein, Calcium, Vitamin B and Ahttp://www.bodyandsoul.com.au/nutrition/nutrition+tips/what+is+quarkr,15903

 

Uses of Quark Cheese

My neighbor made a nice white frosting from our Quark cheese and used it in Oreo Cookies. It was a hit!
Quark Raisin Dough, Quark Crumb Bars, MANDARIN ORANGE CHEESECAKEhttp://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/raw_goatmilk/message/1484
Cheese Cakehttp://grow.cals.wisc.edu/food/know-how-how-to-make-quark
Quark Frostinghttp://caloriecount.about.com/quark-cream-cheese-frosting-recipe-r1296818

 

Unpasteurized Recipe

  • heat 1 quart of goat milk to 88 degrees F
  • add 1 tablespoon of organic buttermilk with active cultures. If your buttermilk is not quite fresh, add an extra tablespoon
  • Cover the pot
  • leave it at room temperature for 24 hours (mixture should have a consistency very similar to yogurt)
  • Pour the mixture into a cheese cloth-lined colander
  • leave the cheese in the colander and cover for 24 hours in refridgerator

http://www.naturalnews.com/029990_quark_cheese_goat_milk.html

My recipe

same as above, except I use 2 quarts milk, if I recall to one cup buttermilk. I’ll advise, as I’ve not made it in awhile

Milk Used

Buttermilk Used

Yield

http://www.budwigcenter.com/anti-cancer-diet.php

 

Homemade Goat Cheese

http://www.katheats.com/homemade-goat-cheese

Thanks Pedro for sharing this

Steps

  • You’ll need a non-aluminum pot to heat the milk. Start by adding about a cup of water to it, and bringing it to a boil for 10 minutes to sanitize the pot. I also put our stirring spoon in the pot to sanitize.
  • After the 10 minute boil, dump out any remaining water, and then pour in the milk.
  • Heat to 86* on medium, while stirring constantly to evenly distribute the heat.
  • Once it reaches temp, you simply open your packet of chevre culture, pour it in, and stir for a minute to incorporate!
  • Cover the pot and place in a warm place for 12-24 hours. Ideally the culture should stay above 75*. Usually the coils on top of your fridge will add some heat, or you can put it in a TV cabinet where the heat from the electronics will maintain temp. Or just stick it in your oven, pour a few cups of boiling water into a bowl, and leave shut. Don’t forget it’s in there!
  • After 12-24 hours the curds will have separated from the whey and firmed up a bit.
  • Once again, you’ll want to sanitize the equipment you’re about to use in the next step. Boil a few cups of water in a pot to sanitize a colander, a stretch of cheese cloth (this will come with the goat cheese kit), and a slotted spoon.
  • Once everything is sanitized (5-10 minutes of boiling), open up the cheesecloth and drape it over the colander.
  • At this point we need to get the curds into the cloth while leaving behind the whey. If the pot/bowl underneath the colander is big enough you can just pour it all through. Pour slowly so that most of the whey will go through the cloth before any curd lands in there. You can also use a slotted spoon to move the curd over, but this will take some time.
  • Now tie the corners of the cheese cloth so that it’s a tight ball and hang to let the whey drain out. The draining will take another 12-24 hours, depending on the consistency you’re going for. This can be done at room temp, but in our example we hung the bag in the (beer) fridge because we let the initial fermentation go for the full 24 hours. I figured that was enough time to get some good flavor.
  • Draining for 24 hours will produce the typical texture you expect from goat cheese, but if you want something that’s more spreadable, consider hanging for less time. Don’t immediately throw away the whey – you can also add a little back to make it more spreadable. The next day you’ve got cheese!
  • At this point you’ll want to add salt to taste, and any herbs you want. You can also make little pucks and roll them in black pepper, or herbs – whatever you want!
At this point you’ll want to add salt to taste, and any herbs you want. You can also make little pucks and roll them in black pepper, or herbs – whatever you want!
Read more at http://www.katheats.com/homemade-goat-cheese#yf6242MPdjeABYmp.99
At this point you’ll want to add salt to taste, and any herbs you want. You can also make little pucks and roll them in black pepper, or herbs – whatever you want!
Read more at http://www.katheats.com/homemade-goat-cheese#yf6242MPdjeABYmp.99
At this point you’ll want to add salt to taste, and any herbs you want. You can also make little pucks and roll them in black pepper, or herbs – whatever you want!
Read more at http://www.katheats.com/homemade-goat-cheese#yf6242MPdjeABYmp.99
Our Contact Information

Email: trunkbranches@yahoo.com
Phone: 801-667-3174

Reserved
 
Facebook